What’s is massage therapy?

Massage involves the manipulation, rubbing, and kneading of the body's muscle and soft tissue.

Massage is recommended by some health care professionals as a complementary therapy, but it is important to make sure that your therapist is properly qualified. There are many different types of massage, such as aromatherapy massage and therapeutic massage to promote general health and well-being and enhance self-esteem. 

Then there is reflexology, remedial massage and sports massage that have a more specific purpose. 

Different techniques are used in all of these and while therapists primarily use their hands, they may also use their forearms, elbows, or feet. Touch is the essence of massage and therapists learn specific techniques and use their sense of touch to determine the right amount of pressure to apply to each person and locate areas of tension and other soft-tissue problems.

The basic goal of massage therapy is to help the body heal itself and to increase health and well-being.

Massage is not a cure for any serious but it can be extremely beneficial in providing welcome relief from the symptoms of many ailments. It is a great relaxation therapy and can ease tension, anxiety and stress, symptoms that are present in many serious illnesses. It can also help with insomnia and depression.

Massage is also known to relax muscles and help with minor sports injuries as well as back pain, headaches, joint pain and stiffness and even some forms of chronic pain.

Massage is also known to stimulate the nerves and increase blood flow and circulation. This information is not intended as medical advice, and should not be relied upon as a substitute for consultation with your doctor who is familiar with your medical needs. Please contact your doctor or healthcare provider before acting on any information.


How long a massage do you offer?

I only offer 90 minute massages.


Should I shower before a massage?

Yes please however if you didn't have time before to get ready you can shower here and it is also available at the conclusion of your massage.


Is there parking?

There is plenty of street parking.


What should I do before a massage?

  • Find the right massage therapist. Look for a therapist who specifically identifies the massage type you’re interested in as part of their practice and background. If necessary, look for someone trained to treat a particular condition, such as sports injuries, fibromyalgia, arthritis, or pregnancy. Also check if the therapist is licensed or certified according to state requirements.
  • Talk to your therapist about any injuries. Be clear about the extent of your injuries, how long they have been healing, and what your current pain level is.
  • Talk about your comfort levels. Tell the massage therapist which areas you do not want them to touch. For example, some people are uncomfortable with their buttocks being massaged.
  • Talk about your goals and expectations. Do you just want to relax? Are you trying to recover from an injury?
  • Discuss pressure. Talk to your therapist about what level of pressure is best for you.
  • Be open. Let your therapist know if you have privacy concerns or areas that you don’t want touched.
  • Warm up. If possible, warm up your muscles by taking a warm shower, soaking in a hot tub, or spending a few minutes in a sauna.
  • Hydrate. Drink plenty of water before your massage.

 


What happens during a deep tissue massage?

Before a deep tissue massage, you will discuss your problem areas with your therapist. A deep tissue massage can be full-body or focus only on one area. You will begin lying on your back or stomach, under a sheet. It’s up to you to what level you undress.

Deep tissue massages begin as a more traditional relaxation massage. After the muscles are warmed up, your massage therapist will begin to work deep into your problem areas. In addition to their palms, finger tips, and knuckles, your therapist may use their forearms or elbows to increase pressure.

It’s important to be open with your massage therapist about the level of pressure and discomfort you wish to endure. This may be different for certain areas and throughout the massage, feel free to communicate with your massage therapist before and during the massage. Some massage therapists find pain to be counterproductive to the process and expect you to speak up if the pain is too much.

You should expect a fair amount of soreness in the days following your deep tissue massage. Your therapist may recommend treating with ice, heat, or stretching.

 


What happens during a Swedish massage?

During a Swedish massage, therapists use kneading, long strokes, deep circular movements, and passive joint movements. These techniques are meant to relax you, stimulate nerve endings, and increase blood flow and lymph drainage.

A traditional Swedish massage involves the whole body. You will begin on either your back or your stomach and flip over at the halfway point. If you have an area of particular concern, such as a tight neck, you can ask your therapist to spend more time in this area. Depending on your preferences, you can ask your massage therapist to use light, medium, or firm pressure.

During most full-body massages the expectation is you’ll be undressed. Your massage therapist will ask you to undress for your massage while they wait outside. It’s up to you whether or not to keep your underwear on. Your massage therapist will drape a sheet over your body, which they will pull back and adjust as they work their way around. You will be covered most of the time.

Your massage therapist will use an oil or lotion to allow for smooth and long stokes. They may also ask if you have a preferred scent for aromatherapy.